The Rediscovering Indigenous Languages project aims to make accessible the rich archival collections of the State Library of New South Wales. The site features historic word lists, records and other documents relating to Indigenous Australian languages.

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Do you think you know more about our language collections? We would love to hear from you!

Get Involved Now!

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The Rediscovering Indigenous Languages project aims to make accessible the rich archival collections of the State Library of New South Wales. The site features historic word lists, records and other documents relating to Indigenous Australian languages.

Find out more

We have items in the Library's collections which have not been linked to an area or language.

View collection items not linked to a language

Do you think you know more about our language collections? We would love to hear from you!

Get Involved Now!
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We have items in the Library's collections which have not been linked to an area or language.

View collection items not linked to a language

The Rediscovering Indigenous Languages project aims to make accessible the rich archival collections of the State Library of New South Wales. The site features historic word lists, records and other documents relating to Indigenous Australian languages.

Find out more

Do you think you know more about our language collections? We would love to hear from you!

Get Involved Now!
  • Our word of the week is EdeengoAccordin...

    Our word of the week is EdeengoAccording to Boxes 4-5: Survey forms and correspondence received by the Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia regarding Aboriginal place names, 1899-1903, 1921-1926, Edeengo means “...
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  • Our word of the week is TrinkyAccording...

    Our word of the week is TrinkyAccording to Mary Jane Cain reminiscences of Coonabarabran, New South Wales and district, 1844-1926, trinky means “broken thigh ” If you want to get involved, you can help us by transcribing...
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  • Our word of the week is MarangoAccordin...

    Our word of the week is MarangoAccording to Survey forms and correspondence received by the Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia regarding Aboriginal place names, 1899-1903, 1921-1926, Box 5 Folder 2, Marango...
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  • Our word of the week is UrokaAccording...

    Our word of the week is UrokaAccording to Charles Macarthur King - Vocabulary of the language of the natives at Port Stephens, ca. 1845-1850, Uroka means “sun”. If you want to get involved, you can help us by transcribing...
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Please read the special care notice before entering the website.

Special Care Notice

Deceased persons
Visitors should be aware that the Rediscovering Indigenous Languages website may contain images or documentation relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are deceased.

About the word lists and vocabularies
This website is not intended to be an authoritative source for Indigenous Languages in Australia. The language lists available from the State Library of New South Wales were recorded historically by many individuals — both amateurs and professionals — who documented Indigenous words, placenames and meanings. This includes records from explorers, surveyors, first settlers, missionaries, anthropologists and linguists.

Visitors to this website should be aware that the language documentation may not reflect current understandings of the use of some languages. Some lists may also record words and meanings inaccurately.

This website will change over time as more documentation becomes available. We encourage users to share their knowledge and information they may have about language of their areas.

Users are warned that there may be words and descriptions which may be considered sensitive and/or offensive in today's contexts.